AYWMC- Feb. 2, 2019

What a difference a week makes! We are now shooting in manual mode and I must say this class has explained the exposure triangle better than any I have seen in the past. It helps that Emma Davies was a schoolteacher. She has a way of explaining and simplifying to help us grasp the basics of what we need to know to get by and actually use the info provided. Now for the assignment. We are starting in aperture priority mode at f8 and will open up the camera one f-stop to f 5.6 for more light, so we will move the shutter speed or the ISO faster or higher to get less light to compensate and get the same exposure. It makes sense now, but I will pick up my camera and be back here. One thing to note is that my camera has three stops in between each of these settings…

This chart is the best! Simple, and useful!

quick guide exposure triangle

So, here is the assignment.

Step 1 Select aperture priority mode, choose an aperture that is a full stop (i..e. f8) and take a photo.

Step 2 Write down what settings the camera picks.

Step 3  Go onto manual mode and dial in the settings that the camera picked, except change the aperture by 1 stop (bigger) to have a wider aperture, and a shallower depth of field.

Step 4 
If you leave the rest of the settings as they were in step 2, your photo will be slightly over exposed, because you have a bigger aperture. So you need to change the shutter speed or ISO by a corresponding 1 stop in the opposite direction (less light). In this case use shutter speed, and change it to 1 stop less light (faster). Take the photo again. Keep everything the same between photos – where you stand, what you’re photographing, how much light there is.

Both the photos should have the same exposure, if the light hasn’t changed and you focused on the same spot. The only difference should be a slightly shallower depth of field in the second photo.

Have another go, this time on shutter priority. Try changing the settings by 2 stops, and by using a combination of both aperture and ISO to compensate

Started with f2.8  then went to f4  and shifted the triangle up ISO one fstop accordingly to achieve the same exposure.

More open aperture needs lower sensitive ISO or a faster shutter speed to have the same exposure. I had some trouble with the aperture locked and figured out my camera had a button that locked on it. Shooting in manual isn’t comfortable for me yet–just need more practice. Have a great week, and catch some light along the way!

 

AYWMC – January 27

ISO – International Standard Organization

ISO refers to the sensitivity of the sensor to light–the higher the ISO, the more noise–so you want to use as low an ISO as possible to still capture the light.  Our assignment this week was to go back to a previous week’s photos and retake them using your camera’s highest ISO and lowest ISO. I tried to recapture the scene as closely as possible but the light is different today (very overcast) so the settings are not identical.

I am spending more time with my camera and continue to read a lot about camera stuff on sites like Light Stalking and Digital Photography School and my Udemy class and my Creative Live class I bought years ago. I love gadgets also, so I ordered a timer remote that would be cool for a stationary time lapse shoot. I continue to investigate tripod heads that will support the weight of my 70-200 mm lens. Any suggestions are welcome here!

Here are the results of my shoot this week: (I’m not seeing a lot of graininess. I increased the ISO 100x. But as you can see the shutter speed had to compensate by being almost 100 x faster as well. And the aperture closed 4 -f stops down.

Thanks for stopping by. Hope you have a great week. Catch some light along the way!

img_8524

Canon EOS 6D
ƒ/2.8   1/160   70mm   ISO 100

img_8530

Canon EOS 6D
ƒ/11   1/1250   57mm   ISO 10000

A Year With My Camera – January 17

2019

…is the year I finally make time for shooting photos that I am proud of. Working the program, A Year With My Camera, I will post photos here that will probably not impress but be more functional as I walk through the lessons.

“Taking pictures is savoring life intensely, every hundredth of a second.”
— Marc Riboud

There are two types of talent. One is learned and one is natural. I don’t have a natural “eye” for “making” a photo, so this must be a learned skill for me. The good news here is that, in my observation, the person that spends time learning a skill always (eventually) exceeds the natural talent. But this will require dedication and lots of practice.

So bear with me as I try to accomplish the learned type of talent. Believe me, when I get to a level that I am proud of the photo I take, I will be so excited. I so want to capture the grandchildren’s expressions and personalities, and freeze some beautiful moments!

January 2019

Shutter Speed – January 19

 

Aperture/Depth of Field – Jan 13

 

 

 

 

January 3 – picking up my camera again.